Miriam’s Cup Honors Women at Passover

Filled with water, it honors women's contributionsAdding Miriam’s Cup to the Seder table is a relatively new tradition designed to honor the role of Miriam, Moses’ older sister (and, symbolically, the contributions of other Jewish women to our culture).

Miriam not only watched over Moses in the bulrushes, she told the Egyptian princess who found him that Yocheved, Moses’ mother, should be his nursemaid.

And years later, when the Israelites wandered in the desert, Miriam led the women in dance.  In her honor, God created a well of spring water that sustained the Israelites.

That’s why, although we fill Elijah’s Cup with wine, we fill Miriam’s Cup with water.

Our Miriam’s Cup is really a handmade pottery goblet that we bought at a local Greek festival.  We love how its wavy motif reminds us of water, with flowers rising from the source of life.

Comments

  1. says

    Please take a look at this. And, if you enjoy this as much as the families that are planning to use it this year, please let your readers know it is available. A video of one of the scripts is available on my facebook page: Carol Bluestein

    NEW! Free Download v3.0 of The Story of Passover: “You Want Me To Do What?” Walk in the sandals of our ancestors through this exuberant Interactive contemporary scripts designed to delight Jewish and Interfaith Families — from the youngest reader to the oldest.

    “You Want Me To Do What” is the most innovative addition to the Passover literature I’ve seen. This is not just another pretty Haggadah….these interactive mini-dramas will make ANY Seder using any Haggadah come alive for all ages.”
    Cantor Charles Bergman, Los Angeles, CA

    Thank you and Enjoy.
    Carol

    • Ellen says

      Thanks for letting us know about this. I’ll take a look — and I’m sure others will, also. I, too, love making the Seder come to life. Depending on the year’s gathering of friends and family, we’ve used scallions as whips; read a fun play; parted the Red Sea; created lyrics to a bluegrass tune as a welcome song; and more!

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